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Policy and Legislation


Does Washington Still Work?

Congress is on a five-week recess that began on Aug. 1 and returns on Sept. 8. Don’t blame them for taking the time off; they are legally required to do so. Yes, they are off campaigning for himself or herself or someone else, as well as taking a vacation. Many would question whether they deserve it, given the number of critical issues left unresolved or unfinished.

CHPS Releases Fourth Edition of CA-CHPS Criteria

The Collaborative for High Performance School (CHPS) released the fourth edition of the California CHPS Criteria (CA-CHPS) on Aug. 25, 2014.

Does Washington Still Work?

Congress is on a five-week recess that began on August 1 and returns on September 8. Don’t blame them for taking the time off; they are legally required to do so.

Slowly Moving In the Right Direction, But One Step At A Time

As the 2014 mid-term elections get closer, members of Congress have found at least one issue where they have come to an agreement that is both bipartisan and bicameral. After months of negotiations, leaders from the House and Senate introduced the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).



Working Towards A Mid-Term Election

As Congress moves nearer to the 2014 mid-term election, some effort is underway in both chambers to find common ground on less controversial issues.

The President's FY2015 Education Budget

On Tuesday, March 4, 2014, President Obama announced his proposed 2015 Fiscal Year Budget. In recent years, the President’s budget has become more of a ritual than a reality. Maybe better described as a White House wish list. Though required by statute, these budgets are usually dead on arrival and until last year, nothing was ever resolved quickly or on time.

Washington At Work

Congress has begun the second session of the 113th Congress with lots of things to do. First and foremost was to raise the debt ceiling before the end of February. Congress met the deadline with days to spare before it went out on the President’s Day recess.

Looking to the Future: Trends for 2014 and Beyond

It's a Mid-term Election Year!

Trying to predict which federal education legislation will pass is never an easy thing to do, especially when it is a Mid-Term Election year.

Finding Some Common Ground: Can it Last for the Next Session of Congress?

The Bipartisan Budget Act passed the House and will pass the Senate and become law before adjourning. There was no interest by the conference committee to a long-term grand bargain that could have included reforms to entitlement programs and taxes. The agreement addresses short-term spending or immediate budget needs.

Let's Make A Deal And Kick the Can Down the Road

This piece was very difficult to write. Influencing what was finally written were: too many false starts and stops to count; changes in strategy; different proposals and the real possibility of coming up with nothing. The shutdown and deficit ceiling part has been rewritten at least five times and this opening three different times. Originally, the title for this piece was “Oh, No! Not Again, or To Be or Not to Be That is the Question,” for the ongoing shutdown, but there was a deal that ended the stalemate late on Wednesday, Oct. 16. However, the pain is not over, nor are the negotiations to solve all of the issues that forced the closure and the brink of not increasing the debt ceiling. The “deal” crafted by Senators Harry Reid and Mitch McConnell, and several senators from both parties passed both houses of Congress and was signed by the President, was a short-term fix. This is the reason for the revised title. The deal was not a fix but a temporary band-aid.