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Wall Coverings

How To Make Walls Safe and Sound

If walls could talk, they would describe constant contact with backpacks, computer bags and feet, as well as blows from mobile classroom carts. These occurrences can cause scrapes and dents on wall surfaces and corners. Because of the abuse they receive, walls in classrooms, hallways, gyms and cafeterias must be durable and easy to clean, requiring little to no maintenance. They must also be manufactured from material that is environmentally sound and maintains safe indoor air quality.

New product offerings deliver all the functional elements required of walls without compromising style. In fact, custom photos, wayfinding, mascots, logos and other art can now be preserved on walls behind impact-resistant, environmentally preferable rigid material that is PVC-free and contains no PBTs and halogenated or brominated fire retardants. The material acts as a protective shield that safeguards against damage while making cleaning easy, so walls remain beautiful for years.

Reviews from schools using the material are beginning to come in, and the grades are impressive. “The hallways of our school get an A+ for design, function and durability,” says Steven Fleming, principal of Pasadena Independent School District’s new Dr. Kirk Lewis Career & Technical High School in California. “Students are motivated and energized even before they enter the classroom. School officials can rest easy knowing that our custom walls can stand the test of time and high school wear and tear.”

In fact, based on the quality of the walls at its high school, the district used the wall protection product for a mural at its elementary school. “We knew that we had an opportunity to do something special and long-lasting at our elementary school,” says Israel Grinberg, the district’s construction manager. “You just can’t get that kind of quality and durability with a hand-painted mural.”

This article originally appeared in the October 2015 issue of School Planning & Management.

About the Author

Amy DeVore, is the Acrovyn Business Development manager for Construction Specialties, Inc.

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